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Extinction threats and CITES protection: Rhodiola as a case study

Written by Sonia Dhanda

2022 marks the nineteenth World Wildlife Conference. Nations from all over the world will meet to enhance the regulation of wildlife trade, defined as the transaction of wild plant and animal resources by humans. Global biodiversity policies exist to protect nature, one such policy is the Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species (CITES), and many medicinal plants are protected by CITES. Medicinal plants are often sustainably harvested from the wild, however, many species are at threat from overexploitation. The collection and trade of wild plants is an important natural resource or source of income for millions of people making this a vital issue for both people and plants.

Sonia Dhanda is a policy advisor on natural resource governance. She specialises in the Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species for Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). Additionally, she is undertaking a PhD with University College London and the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Her doctoral research is examining the conservation, culture and trade of Ayurvedic herbs in the UK as a case study of natural resource governance. Her research interests are ethnobotany, wildlife trade, medicinal plants and biocultural diversity.

Sonia Dhanda

Sonia Dhanda is a policy advisor on natural resource governance. She specialises in the Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species for Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). Additionally, she is undertaking a PhD with University College London and the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Her doctoral research is examining the conservation, culture and trade of Ayurvedic herbs in the UK as a case study of natural resource governance. Her research interests are ethnobotany, wildlife trade, medicinal plants and biocultural diversity.

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