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Edible plants to forage in March

  • Robin Harford
    Robin Harford

    Robin Harford is a plant forager, ethnobotanical researcher and wild food educator. He is the author of the bestselling Edible and Medicinal Wild Plants of Britain and Ireland.

    He established his wild food foraging school in 2008, and his foraging courses were recently voted #1 in the country by BBC Countryfile.

    Robin is the creator of eatweeds.co.uk, listed in The Times Top 50 websites for food and drink.

  • 7:43 reading time (ish)
  • Foraging

Foraging is a fascinating skill that both deepens our relationship to nature and empowers our health. This article shares some interesting plants you can forage here in the UK in March.

Foraging is a wonderful way to connect both with nature, and nourish our health. We also want to spread the word about safe and ethical foraging, so please also read our article “A guide to safe and sustainable foraging” to learn how to practise foraging sustainably.

A useful link with images that can help with identification as well as botanical information is Wild Flower Finder.

Here Robin Harford shares some edible plants you can safely harvest from the wild in March.

Please note: Under Section 13 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, uprooting any wild plant without landowners’ permission is illegal (1).

Cow parsley (Anthriscus sylvestris)

cow parlsey Anthriscus sylvestris

Before harvesting, be absolutely certain of the plant’s identity as it has a poisonous lookalike called hemlock (Conium maculatum) which can be deadly if consumed.

For the best taste, pick young cow parsley plants in the spring when the stems have developed, and older plants may have a bitter flavour.

Cow parsley has a mild, slightly spicy taste and is closely related to chervil (Anthriscus cerefolium) (2).

You can use the leaves of cow parsley fresh, dried, or preserved in salt for later use (3). It makes an excellent substitute for chervil as a garnish in salads, potato dishes, and egg dishes (4).

You can also sprinkle fresh or dried cow parsley as seasoning in soups, omelettes, casseroles, potato and bean dishes (5). It is a lively addition to salads, especially when combined with cold potato, tomato, and cucumber.

Robin Harford

Robin Harford is a plant forager, ethnobotanical researcher and wild food educator. He is the author of the bestselling Edible and Medicinal Wild Plants of Britain and Ireland. He established his... Read more

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